What Constitutes a Catastrophic Injury?

When an individual undergoes an accident, whether it is a car accident, a construction accident or an incident of medical malpractice, they may suffer injuries. If the injuries involve long-term or permanent disabilities or disfigurement, they may be considered catastrophic. There is not a full definition of what is catastrophic and what is not, but injuries that have a significant impact on the life and abilities of the injured person are most likely catastrophic. Some of the injuries we have seen to be considered catastrophic in cases, include:

  • Brain injuries
  • Organ damage
  • Burns
  • Back injuries
  • Paralysis
  • Quadriplegia
  • Nerve damage
  • Amputations
  • Broken bones
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Loss of vision

These types of injuries generally do not heal in a day or two. Catastrophic injuries may require care for months, years or the rest of someone's life. When determining the degree of injury someone has suffered, many factors are taken into consideration. One of the main elements is the debilitating nature of the injury. This means the effect that the injury has on someone's life, what limitations and restrictions has the injury caused in the life of the injured person. Another element is the extent that the debilitation is thought to continue. If the debilitation is significant and is expected to last for a long amount of time, it is most likely catastrophic.

Another factor looked at is the impact that the injury has on the injured victim's life and livelihood. This involves elements such as preventing the person from earning a living or causing permanent disability. An injury does not need to be catastrophic in order for the victim to recover damages, but the damages are generally much higher if the injury is deemed catastrophic. For help in your injury case, contact a Phoenix personal injury lawyer from Palumbo Wolfe & Palumbo.

Categories: Catastrophic Injury

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